Category Archives: miniature painting

More miniature painting with Army Painter Quickshade – this time zombies

While looking for zombie-themed game ideas, I stumbled across this on Twitter which made me smile – it was a group of people discussing how best to prepare for the inevitable soon-to-be-upon-us zombie apocalypse:As a mortician, I always tie the shoelac… Continue reading

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More miniature painting – Wild West cowboys

Work in progress.We’re not even sure that these guys all belong in the same “gang”. We’ve yet to even begin to think about how the rules for an (electronic) Wild West board game would play. So while we’re trying to work it out, here’s a shot of some we… Continue reading

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More miniatures painting – Wild West characters

During a few hours this weekend (the storms are brewing and it’s cold and windy outside, so it’s better to be indoors, wrapped up and warm!) I painted up a couple of Wild West characters. I started with two well known “cowboys” – Billy the Kid and Pat … Continue reading

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Creating a sci-fi industrial base for our space-themed miniatures

Just a quick update on our sci-fi soldiers/robots miniatures – having struggled to come up with anything suitable for the bases for our miniatures (except some excellent looking modelling-putty-stamps on Kickstarter) we eventually hit on a solution: cu… Continue reading

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Removing QuickShade shine with Testors DullCote

There are plenty of posts about “frosting” when using matt varnish all over the internet. We’ve had a right old time with it on a few plastic miniatures too, and were beginning to wonder if this Quickshade was going to work out for us after all.One sol… Continue reading

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Painting miniatures with a wet palette and Army Painter paints

What’s a wet palette?
I had no idea too, until I realised that my painting technique was changing over the course of 10 or 20 minutes. At first, the paint is really smooth and sometimes takes two coats to cover darker shades. Then, maybe 10-15 minutes later, it’s thickened up and is covering really easily. That’s great for block colouring, but a bit of a pain using the same paint for little details (which are more easily painted using thinner, easier-flowing paint).

I’ve been burning through my Army Painter paints, regularly dropping paints onto my ceramic palette (an upturned espresso cup!). Mixing paints from the dropper bottles is great, but because my paints are drying out so quickly, I’m finding I’m using a lot of paint and not actually getting much painted!

The answer? A wet palette.
I’d heard of these, but never bothered with them – it sounds too much like advanced techniques for really good painters (wet blending, gradient shading and so on). It turned out it’s nothing like that. It’s just a way of creating a palette which keeps the paint wet for longer.

Wet palettes can be bought at most art shops and even online. You can pay anywhere between £10 and £50 for a decent set up. I’m not bothered about decent. Cheap and cheerful will do me, until I know what it actually is/does!

Here are the ingredients for my wet palette. The maths set cost £1, the sponges 90p and the baking paper £1.20 (all from Tesco) – total cost: £3.10.

I took one sponge, cut the green scouring pad off and split it in half long-ways. Using a sharp knife (only ever use sharp knives – blunt ones are really dangerous!) I cut the moulded bits inside the maths set box and put wet sponges inside the box. The baking paper is folded to help it resisting curling as it gets wet.

As a trial, I put some “fur brown” paint onto the paper and used a bit on a model.
I chose this paint because it tends to be quite thin to begin with, but skins over – and once a skin has formed, it tends to dry out quite quickly (within another 10 minutes or so). I rinsed my brushes, closed the palette lid and went and made a brew.

Then I went to the shop and got a paper. After reading the paper I got a bit peckish, so made some cheap instant noodles. Then another brew, and after a total of an hour and a half, I tried the paint. It was still fluid and usable. Not only usable, but in the same condition as it was when it first came out of the bottle: no skinning over, no thickening, it still took two coats to cover the slightly darker colours on a model.

So in short – a successful, cheap wet palette. Hopefully this means I’ll be reaching for the bottles of paint much less often and can concentrate on smudging paint over the miniatures rather than mixing and dispensing it. Continue reading

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More miniatures painting

The PCBs are designed, tested, and on order now – just need to wait about 10 days for the first batch of ten from the manufacturer so we can try out some prototype boards – very exciting!While we’re waiting for the boards back, there’s still plenty to … Continue reading

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